Posted by Richard Willett - Memes and headline comments by David Icke Posted on 26 September 2023

Study Reveals “growing numbers of parents and high school students are worried about technologies that monitor students’ online activities”

How technology is used in American schools is not the same for all students.  For many years already, tech experts (aka “Silicon Valley Parents”) have taken drastic measures to limit their own kids’ use and exposure to screens.  This includes sending their kids to low-tech and/or no-tech schools as well as making their nannies sign “no screens” contracts.  In the meantime, many American public schools continue to use “high-tech” curriculums though some have started to ban students’ use of personal cell phones.  Of course, “high-tech” curriculums allow for online activity monitoring and a growing number of parents and students are becoming more concerned about that.

Study Raises Concerns About Monitoring Students, Blocking Content

The Center for Democracy & Technology, a nonprofit that promotes digital rights, found that a small and shrinking majority of parents and students feel that monitoring student behavior online is worth the risks.

Arianna Prothero, Education Week, Bethesda, Md.

(TNS) — Schools are increasingly relying on technology to collect student data and monitor students’ behavior online. But they’re not giving equal consideration to the consequences of these technological strategies, argues a new report from the Center for Democracy & Technology, a nonprofit group that promotes digital rights.

Among them: banning students from accessing important information; putting students’ data at risk to exploitation by hackers; and opening up new avenues for overzealous disciplinary approaches for at-risk student groups.

And with recent advancements in artificial intelligence, these problems are poised to grow significantly, concludes the report, which was released Sept. 20.

The report found — based on surveys — that growing numbers of parents and high school students are worried about technologies that monitor students’ online activities. At the same time, teachers report an increase in schools monitoring students’ personal online activity.

Technologies that monitor students’ online activity have become more popular in schools as a way to respond to rising gun violence and mental health issues among students. Nearly nine in 10 teachers say that their school monitors students’ online activities, and 40 percent say that their school monitors students’ activity on their personal devices such as when a student uses the school’s network or is logged into a school account. Thirty-seven percent of teachers say that their school or district monitor what students post publicly on social media.

Teachers and students report that certain groups are more likely to get in trouble as a result of their schools’ monitoring technology.

Special education teachers and teachers who work in schools that receive Title I funding were more likely to say that they knew of a student who was contacted by law enforcement due to something their school’s online monitoring system flagged.

And LGBTQ+ students report being disciplined as a result of that monitoring more than their non-LGBTQ+ peers.

The percent of students and parents who agree that the benefits of that kind of monitoring outweighs the risks has declined.

When the Center for Democracy & Technology surveyed parents and high school students on this issue for the 2021-22 school year, 63 percent of both groups said the potential benefits are greater than the risks. But those numbers declined substantially the following year, when 52 percent of students and 55 percent of parents said the benefits were worth the risks.

Read More: Study Reveals “growing numbers of parents and high school students are worried about technologies that monitor students’ online activities”

The Dream

From our advertisers