Posted by Gareth Icke Posted on 11 July 2020

Why the Black Lives Matter Protests Didn’t Contribute to the COVID-19 Surge

It’s an issue brought up by many people who support the reopening of businesses and the return of large gatherings in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic.

If there wasn’t an outcry about the spread of the novel coronavirus during the Black Lives Matter protests in late May and early June, why was there one when people returned to restaurants, nail salons, bars, and beaches?

Weren’t the protests a potential “super spreader” of COVID-19?

It’s a concern public health officials initially raised.

“I do think there’s potential for this to be, unfortunately, a seeding event,” Dr. Robert R. RedfieldTrusted Source, the director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), told Congress June 4.

So have the Black Lives Matter protests led to a noticeable increase in COVID-19 cases?

And if not, what has made them different from events such as a concert or a large wedding?

Experts say the short answer to the first question is no.

They say the answer to the second question reveals useful tips on what activities may be lower risk and how to participate in them safely as the country continues to balance a desire to return to normal with staying healthy.

Read more: Why the Black Lives Matter Protests Didn’t Contribute to the COVID-19 Surge

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