Posted by Richard Willet Posted on 23 June 2020

Four things to know about UK ‘anti-hate’ (yeah,right) groups targeting free speech

The British organization that has targeted The Federalist, a U.S. online magazine, is a relatively new nonprofit that primarily has gone after websites in the United Kingdom.  

NBC News cited Stop Funding Fake News, a project of the Center for Countering Digital Hate, in pushing Google to demonetize The Federalist, a mainstream conservative news and opinion site.

Demonetizing would be accomplished if Google didn’t allow The Federalist to carry Google Ads. However, Google has denied this. The British organization also has targeted Zero Hedge, a financial website. 

The British organization that has targeted The Federalist, a U.S. online magazine, is a relatively new nonprofit that primarily has gone after websites in the United Kingdom.  

NBC News cited Stop Funding Fake News, a project of the Center for Countering Digital Hate, in pushing Google to demonetize The Federalist, a mainstream conservative news and opinion site.

Demonetizing would be accomplished if Google didn’t allow The Federalist to carry Google Ads. However, Google has denied this. The British organization also has targeted Zero Hedge, a financial website. 

Here are four key things to know about Stop Funding Fake News and the Center for Countering Digital Hate. 

1. What Is Stop Funding Fake News?

In writing about content at The Federalist, NBC News cited both the Center for Countering Digital Hate and Stop Funding Fake News as sources. 

According to its website, Stop Funding Fake News was established in May as a project of the Center for Countering Digital Hate.

It mostly names British outlets as “fake” and boasts: “Since we launched, we’ve seen one of our target fake news sites completely shut down, and the capacity of several others reduced significantly as a result of us damaging their ability to raise revenue.”

Stop Funding Fake News identifies the site it helped shut down as Westmonster, a media outlet established by pro-Brexit businessman Arron Banks and Michael Heaver, a former aide to Brexit Party leader Nigel Farage. However, the website does appear to still exist, primarily as an aggregator. 

Read More: 4 Things to Know About the British Group Targeting The Federalist

The Trigger


From our advertisers