Posted by Gareth Icke Posted on 4 March 2020

Internal “Investigation” Finds it Was “Proper” to Taser, Tackle Grandma Over Asking for Warrant

‘Bradenton, FL — Barbara Pinkney of Bradenton, in Manatee County, Florida wanted to see the warrant from the cops who had come to her home attempting to arrest a man who she says did not live there. Because she was steadfast in her decision to see the warrant, Pinkney, a 70-year-old grandma who had never been in trouble with police before, was tasered multiple times, thrown to the ground and arrested. Now, after they “investigated themselves” the department has found that tasering the grandmother over asserting her rights was “proper.”

“The Manatee County Sheriff’s Office said it found that the deputy’s level of applied force was lawful, proper and in accordance with agency policy,” the report from the internal investigation released last month reads.

This grandma is now facing charges of obstruction and battery on a law enforcement officer, according to a probable cause affidavit obtained by WFLA. To make matters that much worse, the incident unfolded at 7:30 a.m. on the day after Christmas — which also happens to be Pinkney’s birthday.

“We heard a knock at the door. Actually, there wasn’t a knock. I think they kicked the door. Bam! Bam! At the door,” Pinkney said.

According to WFLA, Manatee County Sheriff’s Office deputies say they came to serve an arrest warrant to Tevin Turner, Pinkney’s grandson, on violation of probation for carrying a concealed weapon. However, Pinkney says he doesn’t live there.

“When he was on probation he gave this as his address, but he wasn’t living here,” she said.

Pinkney tried to tell the deputies this information but they wanted nothing of it. That’s when this rights-flexing grandma demanded cops show her a warrant before coming in her home. When they refused to show her a warrant, Pinkney tried to close the door.

According to the investigation, the officer explained FSS 901.19 authorized him to search the residence without a warrant because he reasonably believed Turner to be inside, but Pinkney said, “No, you show me the warrant.”

The investigation notes that Florida Statute 901.19 states: “if a peace officer fails to gain admittance after he or she has announced both authority and purpose in order to make an arrest by a warrant, the officer may use all necessary and reasonable force to enter any building or property where the person to be arrested is, or is reasonably believed to be.”

Read more: Internal “Investigation” Finds it Was “Proper” to Taser, Tackle Grandma Over Asking for Warrant

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